Just another WordPress.com site

Posts tagged ‘women’

Films About Women’s Issues Internationally

Description

1 videodisc (57 min.) : sd., col. with b&w sequences ; 4 3/4 in.

Note(s)

DVD version of a PBS television program. Previously issued as a VHS videocassette.

Contents

Part 1. Who’s invited? (27 min.) — Part 2. What’s on the menu? (30 min.).

Credits

Executive producer, Lawrence M. Rich ; director of photography, Nicholas Blair ; music, Richard Kimball.

Summary

Examines the ethical questions at the heart of the globalization debate. Reveals the profound negative impact of globalization in our food system. Exposes the myths that hunger is the result of scarcity, that small countries cannot feed themselves, and that only market-driven, chemically-based, industrial agriculure can feed the world. Shows that agribusiness is squeezing out small farmers and that trade liberalization, by allowing mass produced, low-cost food exports to developing countries is destroying peoples’ ability to feed themselves. Discusses the links between food security and social development and tells how women particularly are affected. Looks at the myths surrounding the altering and patenting of life forms, factory farming, and the degradation of the environment.

System Note

DVD format.

 

Full cover girl [videorecording] / a film by Folke Rydén ; produced for SVT in cooperation with WGBH International.

Publisher

[Stockholm, Sweden] : Folke Rydén Production ; Princeton, N.J. : Films for the Humanities & Sciences [distributor], [2009]

 

http://opac.csuchico.edu/search~S4?/Xwomen+international+&searchscope=4&SORT=DZ/Xwomen+international+&searchscope=4&SORT=DZ&extended=0&SUBKEY=women+international+/1%2C25%2C25%2CB/frameset&FF=Xwomen+international+&searchscope=4&SORT=DZ&5%2C5%2C/indexsort=- – here

Description

1 videodisc (53 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.

System Note

DVD-R.

Language

English narration; Arabic dialogue with English subtitles.

Performer

Narrator, Monte Reid ; commentary, Paul Bremer.

Credits

Photography, Dan Jama ; editors, Folke Rydén, Enno Ladwig.

Note(s)

Originally produced in 2008.
  This disc is a recorded DVD and may not play on all DVD players or drives.

Summary

Jinan al-Ubaidy, a devout Shia Muslim and an influential member of Iraq’s parliament, is calling for Sharia-based government–and, as her opponents say, for a return to the subordination of women to men. Abir Al-Sahlani opposes Jinan Al-Ubaidy. Abir returns to Iraq after years in exile to set up a secular political party. Jinan al-Ubaidy and Abir al-Sahlani are featured as this film tracks over four years the tragic conflict of ideologies in which women–targeted by extremists for not wearing hijab, for working outside the home, for driving a car, for having an education–are being killed.

 

View from a grain of sand [videorecording] : [three women, three wars : stories of survival from Afghanistan] / an Ecesis Films production ; written and directed by Meena Nanji ; produced by Meena Nanji and Amie Williams.

Publisher

[Santa Monica, Calif.] : Ecesis Films ; [Harriman, N.Y.] : Distributed by New Day Films, c2006.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://opac.csuchico.edu/search~S4?/Xwomen+in+the+world&searchscope=4&SORT=DZ/Xwomen+in+the+world&searchscope=4&SORT=DZ&extended=0&SUBKEY=women+in+the+world/1%2C33%2C33%2CB/frameset&FF=Xwomen+in+the+world&searchscope=4&SORT=DZ&13%2C13%2C/indexsort=- – here

Description

1 videocassette (55 min.) : sd., col. ; 1/2 in.

Note(s)

“Originally produced on 16mm film in1975 by American University Field Staff and International Planned Parenthood Federation.”

Summary

The scenes in this film are related to the several films in the Faces of change series. The emphasis here is on the activities of the women in theBolivian Andes, the boat people of the China Coast, rural Afghanistan, and a Kenya tribe of natives.

System Note

 

 

http://opac.csuchico.edu/search~S4?/Xwomen+international+&searchscope=4&SORT=DZ/Xwomen+international+&searchscope=4&SORT=DZ&extended=0&SUBKEY=women+international+/1%2C25%2C25%2CB/frameset&FF=Xwomen+international+&searchscope=4&SORT=DZ&7%2C7%2C/indexsort=- – here

Description

1 videodisc (82 min.) : sd., col. with b&w sequences ; 4 3/4 in.

System Note

DVD-R; stereo.

Language

In English with segments in Dari and Pashto with English subtitles.

Note(s)

Subtitle from container.

Performer

Narration: Meena Nanji; interviews: Wajia, Roeena Mohmand, Shapiray Hassan, and R.A.W.A. (Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan).

Credits

Editors, William Haugse, Tchavdar Georgiev, Bob Brooks; music, Andrew Hagan.

Note(s)

“Not rated”–Container.
  “Digitally remastered.” — Container.
  This disc has been recorded using DVD-R equipment and may not play in all DVD players.

Summary

Shot over a three-year period in the refugee camps of north-western Pakistan and in the war-torn city of Kabul, three women’s personal stories are portrayed within the larger context of international interference, war, and the rise of religious fundamentalists in Afghanistan.

 

These are available from Netflix:

Persepolis,  cartoon about being a girl in Iran. 2008
Where do we go now? Christian and Muslim women work together for peace in an Lebanese village. 2011
Snow Flower and the Secret Fan. About two friends in China now and earlier. 2011.
Miss Representaton. About the US media and gender. 2012 (written by Jennifer Siebel Newsom)

http://info.tedxchico.com/

 
Check out this link for some ideas – http://www.peacexpeace.org/connection-point/resources-library/films-videos/

Kim

http://www.wmm.com/orderinfo/how_to_order.shtml#Institutional_Rentals_Continental_US

 

http://www.itvs.org/series/global-voices?gclid=CPysi4eszLICFURxQgodJj4AsA

 

http://www.itvs.org/series/global-perspectives-collection

 

http://victoriafaulknerwomenscentre.blogspot.com/2012/02/international-womens-day-film-fest.html

 

11AM: It’s a Teen’s World: Wired for Sex, Lies and Power Trips(2009, 75 minutes)


“What price do teenagers pay to be cool, hip and popular in a sexually charged social world? Whether it’s posting sexy photos and raunchy video on the net, ass-grabbing in the school hallway or spreading explicit gossip that shatters high school lives, harassment is commonplace, even acceptable. It’s a Teen’s World is an unflinching exposé of three culturally diverse groups of Toronto teens who share what it’s like to navigate a tangled web of sex, lies and power trips.”

 

12:30: No More Tears Sister (2005, 78 minutes)

 

“A story of love, revolution, and betrayal, No More Tears Sister explores the price of truth in times of war. Set during the violent ethnic conflict that has enveloped Sri Lanka over decades, the documentary recreates the courageous and vibrant life of renowned human rights activist Dr. Rajani Thiranagama. Stunningly photographed using rare archival footage, intimate correspondence and poetic recreations, No More Tears Sister recounts Rajani’s dramatic story and delves into rarely explored themes – revolutionary women and their dangerous pursuit of justice.”

 

2:15pm: It’s a Girl’s World: A Documentary about Social Bullying(2004, 67 minutes)


“It’s a Girl’s World takes us inside the tumultuous relationships of a clique of popular 10-year old girls. Playground bullying captured on camera shows a disturbing picture of how these girls use their closest friendships to hurt each other – with shunning, whispering and mean looks – to win social power in the group.”

 

5:00 pm: Club Native: how thick is your blood? (2008, 78 minutes)

“Filmmaker Tracey Deer uses Kahnawake, her hometown, as a lens to probe deeply into the history and contemporary reality of Aboriginal identity. Following the stories of four women, she reveals the exclusionary attitudes that divide the community and many others like it across Canada.”

Through the Negev
(Egypt/Israel, 2007, 18 min)

Told through interwoven first-person accounts by the few women and children who have made the journey by walking from Egypt to Israel, Through the Negev is a short documentary that encapsulates the refugees’ struggle for home and safety.  The documentary gives voice to women and children not often represented in stories about Sudan. We speak to 10-year old Naka and her mother Natalina, who escaped religious persecution in Southern Sudan. We meet ‘Ahmul’, an Arab Muslim student activist who fled Sudan after being tortured for attempting to start a student union. We speak to Affaf from Darfur, who misses her husband. And we meet Ida, a powerful orator who convinces us that home is a universal human right. Caught in complicated geographic, religious and political webs, the simplicity of their message becomes even more powerful.

Film website: www.throughthenegev.org

(un)veiled
(United Arab Emirates, 2007, 36 min)

(un)veiled introduces the audience to ten Muslim women from various backgrounds who now live in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Their discussion about hijab, the headscarf, revolves around a lecture on the same topic that was banned last minute but delivered anyway. In a time when Islam and especially Muslim women are represented as monolithic and beset by backwardness, the women in (un)veiled show the diverse, lively, argumentative debates in Muslim societies about the meanings of modernity, emancipation, and feminism. Dubai, where the filmmaker lived for eight months, becomes a character in itself, showing the complex face of a contemporary Arab city.

Film website: www.der.org/films/unveiled.html

U.S. Premiere

RuTH
(Israel, 2008, 56 min)

During the days of the Israeli withdrawal from the settlements in the Gaza strip, when the residents of the Katif Settlements are uniting to fight for its existence, Ruth, a young teenager from the settlement, is searching for excitement. When Ruth meets Erez, a photojournalist sent to cover the events of the disengagement, she realizes that she doesn’t belong anywhere.

RuTH is an adolescence story of a young girl living in the most dangerous place in Israel. In a society demanding a united front and common beliefs, Ruth fights to interpret her faith in her own way.  It is not a political struggle but the struggle of one girl for the privilege of holding an independent opinion in a social surrounding which strongly embraces a united point of view dictated from above

The Sari Soldiers
(USA/Nepal, 2008, 90 min)

Filmed over three years during the most historic and pivotal time in Nepal’s modern history, The Sari Soldiers is an extraordinary story of six women’s courageous efforts to shape Nepal’s future in the midst of an escalating civil war against Maoist insurgents, and the King’s crackdown on civil liberties. When Devi, mother of a 15-year-old girl, witnesses her niece being tortured and murdered by the Royal Nepal Army, she speaks publicly about the atrocity. The army abducts her daughter in retaliation, and Devi embarks on a three-year struggle to uncover her daughter’s fate and see justice done. The Sari Soldiers follows her and five other brave women, including Maoist Commander Kranti; Royal Nepal Army Officer Rajani; Krishna, a monarchist from a rural community who leads a rebellion against the Maoists; Mandira, a human rights lawyer; and Ram Kumari, a young student activist shaping the protests to reclaim democracy. The Sari Soldiersintimately delves into the extraordinary journey of these women on opposing sides of the conflict, through the democratic revolution that reshapes the country’s future.

Film website: http://www.butterlampfilms.com/index.html

Club Native
(Canada, 2008, 78 min)

In Kahnawake, the hometown of Mohawk director Tracey Deer (Mohawk Girls), there are two unspoken rules: Don’t marry a non-Native, and never, ever have a child with a non-Native. In a community where tribal membership rests on the equivocal measurement of blood quantum (literally the measurement of blood “purity”), following one’s heart requires risking one’s Mohawk status, as well as one’s family and community.

With warmth, intelligence and humor, Deer turns her camera on her own family and the lives of four proud Mohawk women deeply impacted by racism and prejudice rooted in Canada’s highly discriminatory 1876 Indian Act, and exacerbated by lingering preconceptions about blood quantum that have left a divisive legacy in her community.

Club Native raises critical questions about belonging and indignity, the heartbreak of “marrying out” of the Mohawk Nation, and the unjust patriarchal laws that disenfranchise Native women. It is a candid and engrossing work about the pain, confusion, and frustration suffered by many First Nations women, but also a testament to the triumph of love and the resilience of the human spirit.

Film website: http://www3.nfb.ca/webextension/club-native/

Maquilapolis (City of Factories)
(Mexico/USA, 2006, 68  min)

Carmen works the graveyard shift in one of Tijuana’s maquiladoras, the multinationally-owned factories that came to Mexico for its cheap labor.  After making television components all night, Carmen comes home to a shack she built out of recycled garage doors, in a neighborhood with no sewage lines or electricity.  She suffers from kidney damage and lead poisoning from her years of exposure to toxic chemicals.  She earns six dollars a day.  But Carmen is not a victim.  She is a dynamic young woman, busy making a life for herself and her children.

As Carmen and a million other maquiladora workers produce televisions, electrical cables, toys, clothes, batteries and IV tubes, they weave the very fabric of life for consumer nations.  They also confront labor violations, environmental devastation and urban chaos — life on the frontier of the global economy.  In MAQUILAPOLIS, Carmen and her colleague Lourdes reach beyond the daily struggle for survival to organize for change:  Carmen takes a major television manufacturer to task for violating her labor rights.  Lourdes pressures the government to clean up a toxic waste dump left behind by a departing factory.

As they work for change, the world changes too:  a global economic crisis and the availability of cheaper labor in China begin to pull the factories away from Tijuana, leaving Carmen, Lourdes and their colleagues with an uncertain future.

Film website: www.maquilapolis.com

The Greatest Silence: Rape in the Congo
(USA, 2007, 76 min)

Winner of the Sundance Special Jury Prize in Documentary and the inspiration for a 2008 U.N. Resolution classifying rape as a weapon of war, this extraordinary film, shot in the war zones of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), shatters the silence that surrounds the use of sexual violence as a weapon of conflict. Many tens of thousands of women and girls have been systematically kidnapped, raped, mutilated and tortured by soldiers from both foreign militias and the Congolese army. A survivor of gang rape herself, Emmy Award®-winning filmmaker Lisa F. Jackson travels through the DRC to understand what is happening and why.

Produced in association with HBO Documentary Films and the Fledgling Fund, this film features interviews with activists, peacekeepers, physicians, and even—chillingly—the indifferent rapists who are soldiers of the Congolese Army. Harrowing moments of the film come as dozens of survivors recount their stories with an honesty and immediacy that is pulverizing in its intimacy and detail, but this powerful film also provides inspiring examples of resiliency, resistance, courage and grace.

Film website: http://www.thegreatestsilence.org/

Women in Film and Video/New England presents

Women In Film and Television International Short Film Showcase

Take 3 (New Zealand, 2008, 12 min)

The audition room is a minefield for three Asian actresses who are expected to be Asian in ways they are not completely comfortable with.  When the humiliations mount, they transcend their rivalry in one gleeful act of solidarity, empowering themselves with the very stereotype that they’ve been subjected to.


Montreal 1971   (Canada, 2006, 24 min)

Three part poetic portraits taking place throughout the 20th century in Montreal Canada. A story told with few words and great cinematography, Montreal 1971 follows a young woman on her journey through love, loss and loneliness.  Each moment in her life and her memories unfolds in a serious of precious decisions similar to what many women face.


Love Letters (Australia, 8 min)

Steve, an 8 year old, corresponds with 8 year old Theresa, in Africa, through a sponsorship organization which only allows communication until she is 18. Before the contact is cut off, he has to tell her how he really feels.


Colors of the Veil (USA, 5.5 min)

A former U.S. soldier ultimately found her identity in the veil, and became a vanguard of the growing American-Muslim community. Share in her struggles to find a job that accepts her and how her trials have inspired others like her.


Lullaby (Australia, 11 min)

Sisters Poppy and Bella struggle to bring themselves up in a rundown warehouse above a burlesque club where there Mother is a singer.


Quarter to Noon (USA, 2008, 14 min)

Enclosed in a stale office with a single door and a single window and several framed “Best Worker” Awards A worker works. She is good at her job. Consistent, dedicated, and high performing. However, when she discovers a new world outside her office window… she escapes to it.

Through the Negev
(Egypt/Israel, 2007, 18 min)

Told through interwoven first-person accounts by the few women and children who have made the journey by walking from Egypt to Israel, Through the Negev is a short documentary that encapsulates the refugees’ struggle for home and safety.  The documentary gives voice to women and children not often represented in stories about Sudan. We speak to 10-year old Naka and her mother Natalina, who escaped religious persecution in Southern Sudan. We meet ‘Ahmul’, an Arab Muslim student activist who fled Sudan after being tortured for attempting to start a student union. We speak to Affaf from Darfur, who misses her husband. And we meet Ida, a powerful orator who convinces us that home is a universal human right. Caught in complicated geographic, religious and political webs, the simplicity of their message becomes even more powerful.

Film website: www.throughthenegev.org

(un)veiled
(United Arab Emirates, 2007, 36 min)

(un)veiled introduces the audience to ten Muslim women from various backgrounds who now live in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Their discussion about hijab, the headscarf, revolves around a lecture on the same topic that was banned last minute but delivered anyway. In a time when Islam and especially Muslim women are represented as monolithic and beset by backwardness, the women in (un)veiled show the diverse, lively, argumentative debates in Muslim societies about the meanings of modernity, emancipation, and feminism. Dubai, where the filmmaker lived for eight months, becomes a character in itself, showing the complex face of a contemporary Arab city.

Film website: www.der.org/films/unveiled.html

RuTH
(Israel, 2008, 56 min)

During the days of the Israeli withdrawal from the settlements in the Gaza strip, when the residents of the Katif Settlements are uniting to fight for its existence, Ruth, a young teenager from the settlement, is searching for excitement. When Ruth meets Erez, a photojournalist sent to cover the events of the disengagement, she realizes that she doesn’t belong anywhere.

RuTH is an adolescence story of a young girl living in the most dangerous place in Israel. In a society demanding a united front and common beliefs, Ruth fights to interpret her faith in her own way.  It is not a political struggle but the struggle of one girl for the privilege of holding an independent opinion in a social surrounding which strongly embraces a united point of view dictated from above.

The Sari Soldiers

(USA/Nepal, 2008, 90 min)

Filmed over three years during the most historic and pivotal time in Nepal’s modern history, The Sari Soldiers is an extraordinary story of six women’s courageous efforts to shape Nepal’s future in the midst of an escalating civil war against Maoist insurgents, and the King’s crackdown on civil liberties. When Devi, mother of a 15-year-old girl, witnesses her niece being tortured and murdered by the Royal Nepal Army, she speaks publicly about the atrocity. The army abducts her daughter in retaliation, and Devi embarks on a three-year struggle to uncover her daughter’s fate and see justice done. The Sari Soldiers follows her and five other brave women, including Maoist Commander Kranti; Royal Nepal Army Officer Rajani; Krishna, a monarchist from a rural community who leads a rebellion against the Maoists; Mandira, a human rights lawyer; and Ram Kumari, a young student activist shaping the protests to reclaim democracy. The Sari Soldiersintimately delves into the extraordinary journey of these women on opposing sides of the conflict, through the democratic revolution that reshapes the country’s future.

Film website: http://www.butterlampfilms.com/index.html

Club Native
(Canada, 2008, 78 min)

In Kahnawake, the hometown of Mohawk director Tracey Deer (Mohawk Girls), there are two unspoken rules: Don’t marry a non-Native, and never, ever have a child with a non-Native. In a community where tribal membership rests on the equivocal measurement of blood quantum (literally the measurement of blood “purity”), following one’s heart requires risking one’s Mohawk status, as well as one’s family and community.

With warmth, intelligence and humor, Deer turns her camera on her own family and the lives of four proud Mohawk women deeply impacted by racism and prejudice rooted in Canada’s highly discriminatory 1876 Indian Act, and exacerbated by lingering preconceptions about blood quantum that have left a divisive legacy in her community.

Club Native raises critical questions about belonging and indignity, the heartbreak of “marrying out” of the Mohawk Nation, and the unjust patriarchal laws that disenfranchise Native women. It is a candid and engrossing work about the pain, confusion, and frustration suffered by many First Nations women, but also a testament to the triumph of love and the resilience of the human spirit.

Film website: http://www3.nfb.ca/webextension/club-native

Maquilapolis (City of Factories)

(Mexico/USA, 2006, 68  min)

Carmen works the graveyard shift in one of Tijuana’s maquiladoras, the multinationally-owned factories that came to Mexico for its cheap labor.  After making television components all night, Carmen comes home to a shack she built out of recycled garage doors, in a neighborhood with no sewage lines or electricity.  She suffers from kidney damage and lead poisoning from her years of exposure to toxic chemicals.  She earns six dollars a day.  But Carmen is not a victim.  She is a dynamic young woman, busy making a life for herself and her children.

As Carmen and a million other maquiladora workers produce televisions, electrical cables, toys, clothes, batteries and IV tubes, they weave the very fabric of life for consumer nations.  They also confront labor violations, environmental devastation and urban chaos — life on the frontier of the global economy.  In MAQUILAPOLIS, Carmen and her colleague Lourdes reach beyond the daily struggle for survival to organize for change:  Carmen takes a major television manufacturer to task for violating her labor rights.  Lourdes pressures the government to clean up a toxic waste dump left behind by a departing factory.

As they work for change, the world changes too:  a global economic crisis and the availability of cheaper labor in China begin to pull the factories away from Tijuana, leaving Carmen, Lourdes and their colleagues with an uncertain future.

Film website: www.maquilapolis.com
8:00 p.m.
Brattle Theater – $10.00
40 Brattle Street, Cambridge
Tickets available at: http://www.brattlefilm.org

The Greatest Silence: Rape in the Congo
(USA, 2007, 76 min)

Winner of the Sundance Special Jury Prize in Documentary and the inspiration for a 2008 U.N. Resolution classifying rape as a weapon of war, this extraordinary film, shot in the war zones of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), shatters the silence that surrounds the use of sexual violence as a weapon of conflict. Many tens of thousands of women and girls have been systematically kidnapped, raped, mutilated and tortured by soldiers from both foreign militias and the Congolese army. A survivor of gang rape herself, Emmy Award®-winning filmmaker Lisa F. Jackson travels through the DRC to understand what is happening and why.

Produced in association with HBO Documentary Films and the Fledgling Fund, this film features interviews with activists, peacekeepers, physicians, and even—chillingly—the indifferent rapists who are soldiers of the Congolese Army. Harrowing moments of the film come as dozens of survivors recount their stories with an honesty and immediacy that is pulverizing in its intimacy and detail, but this powerful film also provides inspiring examples of resiliency, resistance, courage and grace.

Film website: http://www.thegreatestsilence.org/

Sunday, March 8, 2009

2:00 p.m.
Brattle Theater
40 Brattle Street, Cambridge

Women in Film and Video/New England presents

Women In Film and Television International Short Film Showcase

Take 3 (New Zealand, 2008, 12 min)

The audition room is a minefield for three Asian actresses who are expected to be Asian in ways they are not completely comfortable with.  When the humiliations mount, they transcend their rivalry in one gleeful act of solidarity, empowering themselves with the very stereotype that they’ve been subjected to.


Montreal 1971   (Canada, 2006, 24 min)

Three part poetic portraits taking place throughout the 20th century in Montreal Canada. A story told with few words and great cinematography, Montreal 1971 follows a young woman on her journey through love, loss and loneliness.  Each moment in her life and her memories unfolds in a serious of precious decisions similar to what many women face.


Love Letters (Australia, 8 min)

Steve, an 8 year old, corresponds with 8 year old Theresa, in Africa, through a sponsorship organization which only allows communication until she is 18. Before the contact is cut off, he has to tell her how he really feels.


Colors of the Veil (USA, 5.5 min)

A former U.S. soldier ultimately found her identity in the veil, and became a vanguard of the growing American-Muslim community. Share in her struggles to find a job that accepts her and how her trials have inspired others like her.


Lullaby (Australia, 11 min)

Sisters Poppy and Bella struggle to bring themselves up in a rundown warehouse above a burlesque club where there Mother is a singer.


Quarter to Noon (USA, 2008, 14 min)

Enclosed in a stale office with a single door and a single window and several framed “Best Worker” Awards A worker works. She is good at her job. Consistent, dedicated, and high performing. However, when she discovers a new world outside her office window… she escapes to i
http://www.tugg.com/titles/its-a-girl

To learn more about how this partnership works, please check it out here:

http://www.itsagirlmovie.com/tugg
Ashley Donde
PR & Outreach Coordinator
Shadowline Films
ashley@shadowlinefilms.com
www.itsagirlmovie.com

 

Women’s International Issues   top

Achy Obejas Interview on LaPlaza: Conversations with Ilan Stavans – #139

Noted author and critic Ilan Stavans explores the idea of “Becoming American” with the award-winning Latina writer Achy Obejas. Obejas discusses her experiences as a Cuban-born exile growing up in Chicago. A columnist for the Chicago Tribune, Obejas speaks about her life, her writings and her new novel, Days of Awe , which won the Lambda Fiction Award. Obejas has also written We Came All the Way from Cuba So You Could Dress Like This? and Memory Mango . Produced by WGBH Boston Video (30 min., 2001)

Beyond Beijing : The International Women’s Movement – #1

This independent documentary was produced by women about the largest meeting of women in world history, the Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO) Forum on Women in Huairou, China, in September 1995. Over 30,000 activists convened to communicate, collaborate, celebrate, and influence the outcome of the parallel United Nations Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing. Produced and directed by Salome Chasnoff. (1996, USA, 60 min)

Blossoms of Fire – #138

Shows the Zapotec women of southern Oaxaca, Mexico, in all their brightly colored, opinionated glory as they run their own businesses, embroider their signature fiery blossoms on clothing and comment with angry humor on articles in the foreign press that flippantly and inaccurately depict them as a promiscuous matriarchy. The people interviewed in this film share a strong work ethic and fierce independent streak rooted in Zapotec culture. These qualities have resulted not only in powerful women but also in the region’s progressive politics, manifested in their unusual tolerance of homosexuality. Veteran film editor Maureen Gosling and co-director Ellen Osborne illuminate the infectious self-confidence of the Juchitecan people (75 min., 2000).

Bullshit – #188 DVD Only

Her opponents gave her the “Bullshit Award” for sustaining global poverty. Time Magazine hailed her as one of the great heroes of our time. She is Vandana Shiva and this is a film about globalization, genetic engineering, bio-piracy, food, and water. This vital documentary profiles environmental activist Vandana Shiva (recipient of the Right Livelihood Award and the United Nations’ Earth Day International Award), as it follows her for a period of two years – a whirlwind tour from her organic farm at the foot of the Himalayas to the summit of the World Trade Organization in Mexico to a protest outside the European Patents Office in Munich. Here, in these institutions of power, we watch as Shiva does battle with the proponents of globalization, multi-national corporations like Monsanto, an American bio-tech company manufacturing genetically modified foods (whom Shiva holds responsible for a rash of farmers’ suicides) and Coca-Cola, accused of depleting and contaminating groundwater in India. An insightful, eye-opening, and exhilarating film, Bullshit elucidates some of the most pressing social and technological questions of the 21 st century can genetically modified foods alleviate world hunger? is it legal for corporations to patent natural crops? -can indigenous knowledge inform modern genetic engineering? -as it offers a compelling portrait of a tireless and fearless activist. (73 min., 2005)

Cut From Different Cloth: Burqas & Beliefs – #170 DVD Only

Documentary by prize-winning journalist Olga Shalygin, about the lives of women in Afghanistan today. It is a compelling story of the post-Taliban culture and the traditions that continue to limit the freedom of Afghan women. Seen through the eyes of a 27 year-old American woman living with an Afghan family, this film illustrates the difficulties and dilemmas Afghan women face as they strive for rights guaranteed to them by the new constitution. (57 min., 2005)

DAM/AGE – #135

Traces writer Arundathi Roy’s bold and controversial campaign against the Narmada dam project in India , which led to a conviction for criminal contempt by India ‘s Supreme Court. As the film traces the events that led up to her imprisonment, Roy meditates on her own personal negotiation with her fame, the responsibility it places on her as a writer, a political thinker and a citizen, and the choices she has made. The film is not just the story of modern India, but of what is happening politically in the world today: from the consequences of development and globalization to the ever more urgent need for state accountability and the freedom of speech. By Aradhana Seth (50 min., 2002)

The Easiest Targets: The Israeli Policy of Strip Searching Women and Children – #184 DVD Only

The organization “If Americans Knew” conducted an investigation and was astonished to learn that Israeli officials have been regularly strip-searching women and girls as young as seven and below. Many of these children have been American citizens. Moreover, the mode in which this has been done is often particularly humiliating and, at times, grotesque. This film tells the stories of five women, Palestinian, American, Muslim, Christian, and Jewish, who experienced humiliation and harassment by Israeli border guards and airport security officials. The DVD bonus materials also include information regarding the Israeli-Palestinian conflict that is different from the average U.S. media coverage. (2008, 13 min., plus lengthy bonus material)

Emilia Gonzalez-Clements: International Women’s Movements: To Beijing and Beyond – #79A

Filmed at the 1998 UNL “No Limits” Conference. Emilia Gonzalez-Clements is an applied anthropologist and a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at UNL. She has lived and worked in Mexico, Peru, Nicaragua, Bangladesh, the Dominican Republic, and in several parts of the U.S. She shares the stories of women with whom she has worked during her 15 years of fieldwork, as well as her observations of the 1995 Beijing NGO Forum which “Brought together over 3,000 women to teach, learn, and share strategies for success.”

Femmes Aux Yeux Ouverts (Women With Open Eyes) – #3

Award-winning Togolese filmmaker Anne-Laure Folly presents portraits of contemporary African women from four West African nations: Burkina Faso, Mali, Senegal, and Benin. The film shows how African women are speaking out and organizing around five key issues: marital rights, reproductive health, female genital mutilation, women’s role in the economy, and political rights. (1994, Togo, 52 min, French w/English subtitles)

Germany, Pale Mother (Deutschland bleiche Mutter) – #84

Award Winner, Berlin Film Festival. A powerful love story set during and after the Nazi era; an extraordinary dialogue with the German past. Sanders-Brahms explores the private lives of a young bride and her Nazi soldier husband, and her parents, by-standers who tolerated Hitler. The film is also a moving portrait of a remarkably strong woman who is raped by the American conquerors, accused of infidelity by her husband, yet who remains defiant, with her daughter by her side. (1979; German dialogue with English subtitles, 123 min.)

Hidden Faces – #4

By Claire Hunt and Kim Longinotto. Originally intended as a film about internationally renowned feminist writer Nawal El Saadawi, Hidden Faces develops into a portrayal of Egyptian women’s lives in Muslim society. Safaa Fathay, a young Egyptian woman living in Paris, returns home to interview the famed writer and activist but becomes disillusioned with her. Illuminated by passages from El Saadawi’s work, the film follows Fathay’s journey to her family home and discovers similar complex frictions between modernity and tradition. (1990, 52 min)

Human Trafficking 101-The Presenter’s Kit – #185 DVD Only

The box set contains two films and the first training video dedicated exclusively to the issue of Human Trafficking and Modern Day Slavery. With more than 50,000 victims trafficked into this country every year, the 20-minute Human Trafficking training video was created to build awareness and insight into a growing international problem that affects every city and town in the United States. As the driving force behind the production of this video, filmmaker, activist and founder of the Journey Film Group, Michael Cory Davis has led efforts over the past four years to bring awareness to this issue while giving a voice to those who are too young and scared to seek help. To convey the impact and emotional depth of this crime, Davis decided to offer a special kit that, in addition to the training module, includes his two-award winning films, Svetlana’s Journey and Cargo: Innocence Lost . The short film Svetlana’s Journey takes viewers into the brothel through the eyes of a 13-year old victim; Cargo . The documentary Cargo: Innocence Lost (POST certified) offers hard-hitting facts and testimonials from real-life victims in America. The training module video Human Trafficking is a training guide on all forms of human trafficking. (20 min., 2007)

Iron Ladies of Liberia — DVD #201

After surviving a 14-year civil war and a government riddled with corruption, Liberia is ready for change. On January 16, 2006, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf was inaugurated President – the first freely elected female head of state in Africa. Having won a hotly contested election with the overwhelming support of women across Liberia, Sirleaf faces the daunting task of lifting her country from debt and devastation. She turns to a remarkable team of women, appointing them in positions such as police chief, finance minister, minister of justice, commerce minister and minister of gender. With exclusive access, directors Siatta Schott Johnson and Daniel Junge follow these “Iron Ladies” behind the scenes during their critical first year in office as they tackle indolent bureaucracy, black markets and the omnipresent threat of violent riots. Highlighting the challenges that African countries currently face, this film provides an uplifting example of women who have become the backbone of change. As the filmmakers explore a historic transition from authoritarianism to democracy, the viewer is treated to a joyous, inspirational testimony of the political power of women’s leadership and diplomacy. (2007, 77 min.)

Islamic Conversations: Women and Islam – #5

Leila Ahmed, professor of Women’s Studies at Amherst, argues the case of revision of the widely-held views in the Islamic world about the role of women, using examples from history and the role played by women in the contemporary world. She explains the origin of the veil, and discusses the issue of marriage and women’s rights within marriage. (1994, 30 min)

Lebanon: Bits and Pieces – DVD #206

A beautiful and profoundly moving exploration of the myths and realities of present-day Lebanon as reflected through the voices of women. During the filmmaker Olga Nakkas’ childhood, Lebanon was known to the outside world as an exemplary model of peace in the heart of an Arab Middle East dominated by dictators. Following a seven year absence, Nakkas returned to Lebanon with a camera to record the dreams, disappointments and worries of women of her own generation and to meet a younger generation of women whose only memory is that of war. Through these voices, Nakkas’s own voyage of rediscovery is revealed – rediscovery of her country and of herself. (1994, 60 min.)

Leila Khaled: Hijacker – DVD #208

In 1969 Palestinian Leila Khaled made history by becoming the first woman to hijack an airplane. As a Palestinian child growing up in Sweden, filmmaker Lina Makboul admired Khaled for her bold actions; as an adult, she began asking complex questions about the legacy created by her childhood hero. This fascinating documentary is at once a portrait of Khaled, an exploration of the filmmaker’s own understanding of her Palestinian identity, and a complex examination of the nebulous dichotomy between ‘terrorist’ and ‘freedom fighter.’ (2005, 58 min.)

Love, Women, and Flowers – #6

A film by Marta Rodriguez and Jorge Silva. Flowers are Columbia’s third largest export. But behind the beauty of the carnations sold in the U.S. and Europe lies the horror story of hazardous labor conditions for the 60,000 women who work in the flower industry. The use of pesticides, some banned in the developing countries that export them, has drastic health and environmental consequences. The filmmakers evoke the testimonies of the women workers and document their efforts to organize with urgency and intimacy. (1988, 58 min, w/English subtitles)

Mardi Gras: Made in China – #193

Confronts both cultural and economic globalism by humanizing the commodity chain from China to the United States . Redmon follows the stories of four teenage women workers in the largest Mardi Gras bead factory in the world, providing insights into their economic realities, self sacrifice, and dreams of a better life, and the severe discipline imposed by living and working in a factory compound. Interweaving factory life with Mardi Gras festivities, the film opens the blind eye of consumerism by visually introducing workers and festival-goers to each other. A dialogue results when bead-wearing partiers are shown images of the teenage Chinese workers and asked if they know the origin of their beads, while the factory girls view pictures of Americans exchanging beads, soliciting more beads, and decadently celebrating. The conversation reveals the glaring truth about the real benefactors of the Chinese workers’ hard labor and exposes the extreme contrast between women’s lives and liberty in both cultures. (2008, 71 min.)

Men Are Human, Women Are Buffalo – #194

Combines interviews and shadow puppetry to tell five stories about domestic violence in Thailand. A country that is promoted to western tourists as a fairytale land of beautiful beaches, pristine countryside, cheap vacations and a thriving sex trade industry, Thailand is also one of the developing countries with the highest incidence of violence against women. Women from a range of social origins explain their struggles against violence, discrimination and oppression. This is a powerful film that will challenge students and enliven their discussions regarding gender relations in Thailand. (2008, 29 min.)

My Second Life: East German Women in a Changed World – #7

This film by Simone Shoemaker offers its audience a deeper insight into the very complex process of German reunification by letting East German women speak for themselves. As sixteen women of all ages share their stories, the viewer will get a better understanding of life under the socialist system, as well as how tremendous an impact the reunification has had on people’s lives. (1996, 53 min)

Not yet Rain: A Journey for Reproductive Freedom in Ethiopia – #205 DVD Only

A short film that explores abortion in Ethiopia through the voices of women who have faced the challenge of finding safe care. Through their stories, we see the important role that safe abortion care plays in the overall health of women and their families. DVD includes a toolkit with fact sheets and event planning material. (2009, 20 min)

Official Story, (The) – #8

Winner of the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, The Official Story details the collapse of an affluent Argentinean family. Alicia, the wife of a successful businessman, faces the ultimate challenge when she begins to suspect that her adopted daughter may have been stolen from a family of “los desaparecidos” (the disappeared ones). Determined to find out the truth, Alicia risks everything, even at the cost of her own family. (1985, 110 min, Spanish w/English subtitles)

Pray the Devil Back to Hell – DVD #214

Pray the Devil Back to Hell is the celebrated documentary film that tells the dramatic success story of the women’s peace movement of Liberia : a courageous group of Christian and Muslim women who banded together to pray for peace and demand it from their warmongers, successfully ending a bloody civil war. The film chronicles the remarkable story of the courageous Liberian women who came together to end a bloody civil war and bring peace to their shattered country. Armed with only their white T-shirts and the courage of their convictions, they took on the warlords and nonviolently forced a resolution during the stalled peace talks. A story of sacrifice, unity and transcendence, the film honors the strength and perseverance of the women of Liberia . Inspiring, uplifting, and most of all motivating, it is a compelling testimony of how grassroots activism can alter the history of nations. ( Includes both a 60-min. and a 72- min. version, 2009) See also: Iron Ladies of Liberia -DVD #201

Peace Train to Beijing and The U.N. 4 th World Conference on Women – DVD #211

A revealing study of solidarity in motion, Peace Train to Beijing tells the story of 230 women and 10 men from 42 countries who cross two continents to reach the Fourth UN Conference on Women (August 7-29,1995). The train was sponsored and organized by the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF). During the three-week trek from Helsinki, Finland, participants meet with women’s groups and political leaders, and put theory into practice as they create a “metaphorical community” on the train. Included is unique footage of the Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO) Forum, where 30,000 women from around the world organize and strategize for women’s rights, as well as interviews with South Asian author/activist Vandana Shiva, Rosalie Bertell, Cora Weiss and Dessima Williams. Featured on the PBS series Rights and Wrongs, this is an ideal film to stimulate discussion in courses on women’s studies, political science, and economics. Themes include: the impact of religious fundamentalism, women and militarism (nuclear and conventional), food security and trafficking in women. Produced by Green Valley Media (DVD 58 minutes)

Prose, Politics, and Power: Conversations with Muslim Women Leaders – #9

Produced by the Sisterhood is Global Institute. There are 500 million Muslim women living in vastly different cultural, economic, and political circumstances throughout the world. They share two strong and contradictory experiences. On the one hand, they are increasingly conscious of their rights as human beings and proud of their achievements in a wide range of fields, including education, the arts, science, and politics. On the other hand, they face a resurgence of fundamentalism that strives to limit their ambitions and potentials. These fascinating conversations with Muslim women from different countries and backgrounds address the complexities of the issues that weave tradition with modernity, faith with freedom, and universalism with diversity in Muslim societies and beyond. (1996)

Rishte – #10

A film by Manjira Datta. Following the story of Lali Devi, a mother of five daughters who poisoned herself and two of her daughters, Rishte explores the practice of male sex preference in India and how this led to her suicide. This moving and informative film also follows the efforts of Shyamkali, an activist who has established a community organization dedicated to raising Indian women’s awareness about the impact of sex preference on their lives and their legal rights in this issue. (1995, 28 min)

Seeds of Plenty, Seeds of Sorrow – #11

A film by Manjira Datta for Media Workshop/BBC. A documentary from India about the effects of the highly touted Green Revolution. Credited with ensuring that India is no longer a developing countries, “basket-case,” the Green Revolution is widely regarded as one of the most successful development strategies of the 20th century. But this film reveals that in India it has helped to create a new serf class and the dramatic yields of the early years have fallen away in the wake of pesticide poisoning and the short-lived miracle wheat strains. (1992, 52 min)

Señorita Extraviada – DVD and VHS #145

Award-winning documentary from director Lourdes Portillo, “Missing Young Woman” tells the story of the over 370 kidnapped, raped and murdered young women of Juarez, Mexico. The murders first came to light in 1993 and young women continue to ‘disappear’ to this day without any hope of bringing the perpetrators to justice. Who are these women from all walks of life and why are they getting murdered so brutally? The documentary moves like the unsolved mystery it is, and the filmmaker poetically investigates the circumstances of the murders and the horror, fear and courage of the families whose children have been taken. Yet it is also the story of a city of the future; it is the story of the underbelly of our global economy. (74 min., 2001)

The Shape of Water – #189 DVD

Filmed over four years on three continents, The Shape of Water is an inspirational testament to grassroots activism. Shape skillfully interweaves the stories of Khady (Senegal), Oraiza (Brazil), Bilkusben (India), DonaAntonia (Brazil), Gila (Jerusalem) and Vandana Shiva (India) -seeking to end oppressive social, political, and economic practices in remote corners of the world. The women abandon female genital mutilation, tap for rubber to protect the rainforest, protect the biodiversity of the planet and oppose military occupation. The film works well in classes that discuss women’s issues and struggles, globalization and development, and the daily life of women in Latin America, Africa, Asia, and in the Middle East. The film makes the abstract and pervasive issue of globalization to become comprehensible in human terms. Class discussion topics have included the various impacts of globalization and how and why people are moved to make changes in their lives. The film also makes links between plastic surgery in the US and FGM in other parts of the world. (70 min., 2006)

Status of Latina Women (The) – #12

This program looks at the differences between the U.S. Latina and her Latin American and American counterparts. It also examines how Latino men regard successful, professional Latina women, and at the myths and mystiques of machismo among Latinos in the age of two-income families and shared child-rearing responsibility. Also profiled is a Latina feminist, who has shown that activism is not just a Latino male’s prerogative. (1993, 26 min)

Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Maathai – DVDs #209A and #209B

A film by Lisa Merton and Alan Dater. Original soundtrack by Samite. Taking Root tells the dramatic story of Kenyan Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Wangari Maathai whose simple act of planting trees grew into a nationwide movement to safeguard the environment, protect human rights and defend democracy.
DVD 209A includes: 80-minute feature, 53-minute broadcast version, and a 90-minute of extra interviews and information.
DVD 209B includes 80-minute feature only. (2008)

The Ties that Bind – #13

A film by Su Friedrich presents the compelling story of an ordinary woman, the filmmaker’s mother, living through Nazi German. Far different from traditional documentaries, Friedrich juxtaposes images of her mother’s daily activities with her voice-over narration of the stories of her past, New York Times headlines, and present-day footage of West Germany. Friedrich achieves more than an interview of a mother by a daughter: a search for the definition of history and a challenge to our own responsibility for the present. (1984, 55 min)

Troubled Harvest –  #14

A video by Sharon Genasci and Dorothy Valesco. This award-winning documentary examines the lives of women migrant workers from Mexico and Central America as they work in grape, strawberry, and cherry harvests in California and the Pacific Northwest. Interviews with women farm workers reveal the dangerous effects of pesticides on their health and that of their children, the problems they encounter as working mothers of young children, and the destructive consequences of U.S. immigration policies on the unity of their families. (1990, 30 min)

Voices of Women: Thinking Globally, Acting Locally – #134

Short summary of the United Nations Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing in 1995, with interviews of Bella Abzug, among others. (15 min., 1996)

Warrior Marks – #15

A poetic and political film by Pratibha Parmar about female genital mutilation, presented by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author Alice Walker. Female genital mutilation affects 100 million of the world’s women and this remarkable film unlocks some of the cultural and political complexities surrounding this issue. Interviews with women from Senegal, the Gambia, Burkino Faso, the United States, and England who are concerned with and affected by genital mutilation are interspersed with Walker’s own reflections on the subject. (1993, 54 min)

We Feed the World – #191 DVD Only

Close to 1 billion of the nearly 7 billion people on earth are starving worldwide. But the food we are currently producing could feed 12 billion people. What do we eat? Where does our food come from? Does the traditional farmer still exist? Who are the profit makers in the gigantic food industry? And who is paying the price? What does world hunger have to do with us? This is a film about food and globalization, the flow of goods and cash flow -a film about scarcity amid plenty. Interviewed are not only fishermen, farmers, agronomists, biologists and the UN’s Jean Ziegler, but also the director of production at Pioneer, the world’s largest seed company, and Peter Brabeck, Chairman and CEO of Nestlé International, the largest food company in the world. (2005, 96 min.)

When Women Unite: The Story of An Uprising – #16

This is a film on one of the most extraordinary social uprisings of modern India, a spontaneous upsurge by rural women against state supply of liquor to their villages, eventually forcing the government to capitulate to the popular will and declare statewide prohibition. This film is an in-depth look at this unique ferment of feminism, politics, and democracy. (80 min)

Where the Water Meets the Sky – DVD #212

Sometimes a single story can unite an entire community. Narrated by Morgan Freeman, Where the Water Meets the Sky is the story of a remarkable group of women in a remote region of northern Zambia, who are given a unique opportunity: to learn how to make a film, as a way to speak out about their lives and to challenge the local traditions which have, until now, kept them silent. Many in the group can’t read or write, most are desperately poor, and few have been exposed to film or television. But with the help of two teachers, this class of 23 women learn to shoot a film that portrays a subject of their own choosing. It involves an issue that is traumatic for them all, and rarely spoken about: the plight of young women orphaned by AIDS. Their film recounts the real-life experiences of Penelop, an 18-year-old orphan, and her struggle to provide for herself and her siblings in the wake of her parents’ deaths. What begins as a workshop about filmmaking, and a quest to tell Penelop’s story, becomes a journey in empowerment as the women rise to the challenge of pressing their community to change. Uplifting and poignant, Where the Water Meets the Sky is the story of an unforgettable group of women who defy long traditions of silence and who demonstrate with courage, humor and resilience that their futures are once again something of promise. Camfed, 2008 (DVD 60 minutes)

Who’s Counting: Marilyn Waring on Sex, Lies and Global Economics- #181

Marilyn Waring was first elected to the New Zealand parliament in 1975 at the age of 22. She was re-elected three times and blazed a trail that eventually overturned her government on the nuclear issue and launched her as the foremost spokesperson for global feminist economics. Waring challenges the myths of economics, its elitist economic policy. Why isn’t the unpaid work of women counted in the gross domestic product? Why is there no place in the national accounts for negative figures or costs such as damage to the environment? Why is the market economy all that counts? Excellent onsite footage of a diversity of women and locale is included. (1995, 52 min.)

Women and War – DVD and VHS #156

Interwoven with gripping footage from recent conflicts in the Middle East, Bosnia, northern Uganda, and South Africa, this compelling program captures women’s personal experiences of military violence, explains how they survived, and reflects on their growing resistance to war. The women’s feelings of loss, uncertainty, and anguish are expressed through stories of cruelty, degradation, and psychological trauma, while their attempts to achieve reconciliation and rebuild shattered communities demonstrate their positive efforts to create a more peaceful future for everyone. Funded in part by the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation and the Development Research Centre. (2002; 52 min.)

The Women’s Kingdom – DVD #202

Keepers of one of the last matriarchal societies in the world, Mosuo women in a remote area of southwest China live beyond the strictures of mainstream Chinese culture – enjoying great freedoms and carrying heavy responsibilities. Beautifully shot and featuring intimate interviews, this short documentary offers a rare glimpse into a society virtually unheard of 10 years ago and now often misrepresented in the media. Mosuo women control their own finances and do not marry or live with partners; they practice what they call “walking marriage.” A man may be invited into a woman’s hut to spend a “sweet night,” but must leave by daybreak. While tourism has brought wealth and 21st century conveniences to this remote area, it has also introduced difficult challenges to the Mosuo culture – from pollution in the lake, to the establishment of brothels, to mainstream ideas about women, beauty and family. This finely wrought film is a sensitive portrayal of extraordinary women struggling to hold on to their extraordinary society. (2006, 22 min.)

Year of the Woman-A Fantasy – DVD #210

By: Sandra Hochman
The film they couldn’t stop about the revolution they couldn’t stop. “Year of the Woman” is a film of the cinema verite style, a more provocative approach to documentary. Filmmaker Sandra Hochman is featured in nearly every scene, unafraid of those who she interviews (a cast which includes Warren Beatty and Gloria Steinem) and undaunted by the men and the media at the 1972 Democratic National Convention. It is a film about the first National Women’s Political Caucus, which took place at the 1972 Democratic National Convention in Miami Beach , Fla. Hochman was running as a delegate for Shirley Chisholm, the first black woman to run for president. In “Year of the Woman,” Hochman said she added her “own humor to what she considers a serious cause,” believing in humor’s power of poignancy. In an interview with then-Washington Post columnist Art Buchwald that is interspersed throughout the film, Hochman displays such humor, at one point posing the question of whether or not Julia Child was ready to be president. In demonstrations featuring alligator masks and chants, Hochman responds to the assertion that women were freaks. When “Year of the Woman” was first released in 1973, it enjoyed tremendous success for less than a week before being purchased by an outside group and hidden from the public for more than 30 years. Hochman asserts that this occurred because the film “was too outrageous.” The uniqueness of the film is evident – interwoven with Hochman’s poetry and scenes of stars and galaxies, which largely provide the distinctive, perceptive narration that is the film’s point of view. As for the significance of “Year of the Woman” in today’s political atmosphere, Hochman claims, “It’s very relevant, because the women’s movement is still part of the struggle of the women of today, fighting for equality that we still don’t have in the way that we would like to… it’s relevant in the same way that the founding fathers of the nation were relevant when they wrote the Constitution of the United States and are still relevant today.”

 

http://www.unl.edu/womenssp/video-and-dvd-library#international

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: